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Understanding and Managing Canine Hip Dysplasia

Hip Displasia Image courtesy of Karolina Grabowska laying down

Canine hip dysplasia is a common orthopedic condition that affects dogs of all breeds and sizes. It is characterized by an abnormal formation of the hip joint, leading to joint instability and eventual degradation. This condition can cause pain, discomfort, and reduced mobility in affected dogs.

If you are a dog owner, you may have heard of this condition before. Canine Hip Dysplasia is a common orthopedic problem that affects many dogs, especially large and giant breeds. It occurs when the hip joint doesn’t develop properly, leading to instability, pain, and eventually arthritis.

Whether you are looking for information on how to recognize the signs of hip dysplasia or want to learn more about this condition, this article will equip you with the knowledge and tools to better understand and manage canine hip dysplasia.

We will also explore various treatment options available, including both non-surgical and surgical approaches. Additionally, we will discuss alternative treatments and preventive measures to help manage and prevent this condition.

So, let’s dive in and explore this important topic together.

Understanding Canine Hip Dysplasia: A Basic Overview

Understanding Canine Hip Dysplasia is crucial for dog owners to recognize the signs and seek appropriate treatment. Canine hip dysplasia is a condition that affects the hip joint in dogs. To understand this condition better, let’s dive into a basic overview of canine hip dysplasia.

What is Canine Hip Dysplasia?

Canine hip dysplasia is a developmental disorder that affects the hip joint in dogs. It is characterized by an abnormal formation of the hip joint, leading to joint instability and degeneration. The condition can range from mild to severe and can affect one or both hips.

How Does Canine Hip Dysplasia Develop?

Canine hip dysplasia is primarily a genetic condition, meaning it is inherited from the dog’s parents. Environmental factors and lifestyle choices can also contribute to the development and progression of hip dysplasia. The condition typically develops during the growth stages of a dog, with symptoms becoming more apparent as the dog ages.

Understanding the Anatomy of the Hip Joint

The hip joint is a ball-and-socket joint where the head of the femur (thigh bone) fits into the acetabulum (pelvic socket). In dogs with hip dysplasia, the joint does not form properly, resulting in a loose or unstable connection between the femur and the pelvis. This instability can lead to abnormal wear and tear of the joint, causing pain and discomfort.

Breeds Prone to Canine Hip Dysplasia

Although canine hip dysplasia can affect any dog breed, certain breeds are more prone to developing this condition.

Large and giant breeds, such as German Shepherds, Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and Rottweilers, are commonly affected. Smaller breeds can also be affected, although the prevalence is lower compared to larger breeds.

Impact on a Dog’s Quality of Life

Canine hip dysplasia can significantly impact a dog’s quality of life, causing pain, discomfort, and reduced mobility. Dogs with hip dysplasia may experience difficulty in walking, running, jumping, and climbing stairs. The condition may also lead to muscle atrophy, joint inflammation, and secondary issues like arthritis.

Causes and Risk Factors of Canine Hip Dysplasia

Canine hip dysplasia is a complex condition influenced by various factors. This condition has genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors contributing to its development. Understanding the causes and risk factors associated with this condition can help dog owners take proactive measures to prevent its development or manage it effectively. In this section, we will explore the primary causes and risk factors of canine hip dysplasia.

Genetic Factors:

  • Genetic predisposition: Certain dog breeds are more prone to developing hip dysplasia. As we mentioned above, breeds like German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, and Rottweilers have a higher incidence of the condition.

Canine hip dysplasia has a strong genetic component and is often passed down from parents to offspring. Certain genes can contribute to abnormal hip joint development, leading to a higher risk of hip dysplasia in certain breeds. Breeding dogs with known hip dysplasia or those carrying the genetic predisposition increases the likelihood of offspring developing the condition.

Environmental Factors:

Environmental factors play a role in the development and progression of canine hip dysplasia.

  • Rapid growth: Dogs that experience rapid growth during their early stages, such as large and giant breeds, are at a higher risk of developing hip dysplasia. Rapid growth during puppyhood can put excessive stress on the developing hip joint, potentially leading to dysplasia. Overfeeding, improper nutrition, and excessive exercise on hard surfaces at a young age can also contribute to the development of hip dysplasia.

Lifestyle Factors:

  • Excessive exercise: Overexertion or excessive exercise during the growth phase can put stress on the developing joints, leading to hip dysplasia. High-impact activities, such as jumping from heights or intense agility training, can also contribute to joint instability and dysplasia.
  • Obesity: Excess weight places additional strain on the hip joint, increasing the likelihood of hip dysplasia.

A dog’s lifestyle and daily activities can impact the likelihood of developing hip dysplasia.

Age-Related Factors:

Age-related factors can significantly influence the development and progression of Canine Hip Dysplasia. In this section, we will delve into the impact of aging on joint health, differentiate between early onset and late onset Hip Dysplasia, and discuss how to spot signs of Hip Dysplasia in older dogs.

  • The Impact of Aging on Joint Health. Understanding of how the aging process can affect the integrity and function of the hip joints. Understanding the degenerative changes and wear-and-tear on the joints over time.
  • Early Onset vs. Late Onset Hip Dysplasia. Differentiation between Hip Dysplasia that manifests at a young age and that which develops later in life

Understanding the age-related factors in Canine Hip Dysplasia allows us to recognize the specific challenges faced by older dogs and implement appropriate measures for their care. By monitoring for signs of Hip Dysplasia and implementing effective management strategies, we can help older dogs live comfortably and maintain their mobility. In the final section, we will explore preventive measures for Canine Hip Dysplasia.

Other Factors:

  • Hormonal imbalances, such as an excessive production of growth hormones, can affect the proper development of the hip joint. Traumatic injuries or accidents involving the hip joint can also lead to the development of hip dysplasia later in life.
  • Poor nutrition: Inadequate or improper nutrition during the puppy stage can contribute to the development of hip dysplasia.

Understanding the causes and risk factors associated with canine hip dysplasia helps dog owners to make informed decisions regarding breeding practices, nutrition, exercise routines, and overall care. By addressing these factors, it is possible to reduce the risk or manage the condition effectively. In the following sections, we will delve deeper into recognizing the symptoms of hip dysplasia and the diagnostic and treatment options available.

Recognizing the Symptoms of Canine Hip Dysplasia

Recognizing the symptoms of canine hip dysplasia is crucial for early detection and prompt treatment. While the signs may vary depending on the severity of the condition, understanding the common symptoms can help dog owners identify when their furry friends may be experiencing hip dysplasia. In this section, we will explore the key signs to look out for.

Changes in Mobility:

  • Difficulty rising from a lying or sitting position
  • Lameness or limping, especially after exercise
  • Stiffness and reluctance to engage in physical activities
  • Difficulty or reluctance to run, jump, or climb stairs
  • Bunny hopping (using both hind legs simultaneously) instead of a normal gait
  • Audible clicking or popping sound from the hip joint
  • Muscle atrophy in the hind legs

Changes in Behavior:

  • Increased irritability or aggression due to pain or discomfort
  • Reluctance to engage in previously enjoyed activities
  • Signs of depression or withdrawal
  • Difficulty getting comfortable, frequent shifting of weight or positions
  • Visible Signs of Discomfort or Pain:
  • Limping or favoring one hind leg over the other
  • Audible clicking or grinding sound in the hip joint
  • Swelling or inflammation around the hip area
  • Muscle atrophy (wasting) in the hindquarters

Loss of Muscle Mass in Hind Legs:

Hip dysplasia can result in muscle atrophy in the hind legs. You may notice a decrease in muscle tone or bulk in the thigh and buttock area. This loss of muscle mass can contribute to weakness and instability in the hip joint, further exacerbating the symptoms.

It’s important to note that some dogs may exhibit subtle signs of hip dysplasia, while others may show more pronounced symptoms. Additionally, the severity of the symptoms can vary from dog to dog. If you notice any of these signs or suspect that your dog may have hip dysplasia, it is recommended to consult with a veterinarian for a proper diagnosis.

Advanced Symptoms of Canine Hip Dysplasia

As canine hip dysplasia progresses, more advanced symptoms may manifest in affected dogs. In this section, we will explore these symptoms, which may indicate a worsening condition and the need for more intensive management and treatment.

Severe Limping or Difficulty Walking

As hip dysplasia advances, dogs may experience more pronounced limping or difficulty walking. The limp may become more pronounced and persistent, and they may struggle to bear weight on the affected leg. This can significantly impact their mobility and overall quality of life.

Joint Swelling

Hip dysplasia can lead to inflammation and swelling in the affected hip joint. You may notice visible swelling or observe increased warmth and tenderness around the hip area. Joint swelling can further contribute to discomfort and limited range of motion.

Loss of Interest in Physical Activity

Dogs with advanced hip dysplasia may exhibit a decreased interest in physical activities they once enjoyed. They may become less willing to participate in exercise, play, or even short walks. This loss of interest can be attributed to the discomfort and pain associated with hip dysplasia.

Signs of Pain when Touched or Moved

As the condition progresses, dogs with hip dysplasia may exhibit clear signs of pain when the affected hip joint is touched or manipulated. They may yelp, flinch, or display signs of distress. Dogs with hip dysplasia may also show signs of discomfort when attempting to rise from a lying position or when moving in certain ways.

Identifying these advanced symptoms is crucial for providing appropriate care and intervention. If you observe any of these signs in your dog, it is essential to consult with a veterinarian to assess the severity of the condition and explore further treatment options.

In the next section, we will discuss the various methods used to diagnose canine hip dysplasia, allowing for a comprehensive evaluation of the condition and facilitating appropriate treatment planning.

Diagnosis and Treatment Options for Canine Hip Dysplasia

Diagnosing and treating canine hip dysplasia requires a comprehensive approach involving various diagnostic tests and treatment options. In this section, we will explore the common methods used to diagnose hip dysplasia in dogs and discuss the available treatment options.

Diagnostic Tests for Canine Hip Dysplasia:

  • Physical Examination: A veterinarian will perform a thorough physical examination of your dog, assessing their gait, range of motion, and any signs of pain or discomfort.
  • X-rays: X-rays are the most common diagnostic tool for hip dysplasia. They can reveal the abnormal formation of the hip joint, the degree of joint laxity, and the presence of secondary issues such as arthritis.
  • Hip Evaluation Programs: Several organizations offer specialized hip evaluation programs, such as the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) and the PennHIP method. These programs provide more detailed assessments of hip joint health, including measurements and scoring systems.

Observation of Dog’s Behavior and Mobility

Apart from physical examination and imaging, observing the dog’s behavior and mobility is crucial in diagnosing hip dysplasia. The veterinarian will assess how the dog moves, walks, and performs certain physical activities. They may observe the dog’s gait, range of motion, and signs of discomfort or pain during specific movements. This careful observation helps to correlate the clinical signs with the imaging findings and determine the extent of the condition.

By utilizing a combination of physical examination, imaging techniques, and behavioral observation, veterinarians can accurately diagnose canine hip dysplasia, allowing for appropriate treatment planning. In the next section, we will delve into the various treatment and management options available to address this condition and alleviate the dog’s discomfort.

Non-Surgical Treatments for Canine Hip Dysplasia

Non-surgical treatments play a vital role in managing Canine Hip Dysplasia and improving the quality of life for affected dogs. In this section, we will explore various non-surgical treatment options available for Canine Hip Dysplasia.

Importance of Weight Management and Exercise

Maintaining a healthy weight is crucial for managing canine hip dysplasia. Excess weight puts additional stress on the hip joint, exacerbating symptoms. A balanced diet and portion control can help prevent obesity and reduce strain on the joints. Additionally, low-impact exercises, such as controlled walks and swimming, can help strengthen muscles and maintain joint mobility without causing excessive stress on the hip joint.

It is important to note that the most suitable treatment and management approach will depend on the individual dog and the severity of their hip dysplasia. Consulting with a veterinarian is essential to develop a personalized treatment plan that addresses the specific needs of the dog.

By implementing a combination of medications, supplements, physical therapy, and, if necessary, surgical interventions, along with weight management and appropriate exercise, we can provide our dogs with the best possible care and support to manage their hip dysplasia.

  • Weight Management: Maintaining a healthy weight is crucial for minimizing stress on the hip joints. Excess weight puts additional stress on the hip joints, exacerbating the condition and increasing discomfort. A veterinarian can provide recommendations on an appropriate diet and feeding plan to help manage weight and prevent obesity in dogs with hip dysplasia.

Physical Therapy

  • Physical Therapy: Physical therapy techniques, and targeted exercises including passive range-of-motion exercises, hydrotherapy, and therapeutic exercises, can help improve mobility, reduce pain, and strengthen supporting muscles. Some therapeutic exercises and techniques that may be beneficial include:
  1. Range-of-motion exercises: These exercises help improve joint flexibility and reduce stiffness. Gentle movements and stretches can be performed under the guidance of a veterinarian or a certified canine rehabilitation therapist.
  2. Hydrotherapy: Water-based exercises, such as swimming or underwater treadmill therapy, provide low-impact workouts that help strengthen muscles without placing excessive strain on the joints. Hydrotherapy can improve range of motion, muscle tone, and overall fitness.
  3. Controlled leash walking: Regular, controlled walks on a leash can help maintain muscle tone and joint flexibility. It is essential to avoid excessive strain or high-impact activities that may worsen the condition.
  4. Physical therapy modalities: Therapeutic modalities such as heat therapy, cold therapy, ultrasound, and laser therapy may be used to reduce pain, inflammation, and promote healing in the affected hip joint.

Exercises, Medication and Pain Management

  • Exercise Modification: Low-impact exercises, such as swimming or controlled leash walks, can help maintain muscle strength and joint mobility without putting excessive stress on the hips.
  • Medications: Depending on the severity of the condition, veterinarians may prescribe pain medications, anti-inflammatory drugs, and joint supplements to alleviate discomfort and manage inflammation.
  • Pain management is a crucial aspect of Canine Hip Dysplasia treatment. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed to relieve pain and reduce inflammation in affected dogs. However, it is essential to consult with a veterinarian to determine the appropriate medication, dosage, and potential side effects.

Additionally, supplements such as glucosamine, chondroitin, omega-3 fatty acids, and joint-supporting nutraceuticals may be recommended to promote joint health and reduce inflammation. See Dietary Supplements for more information.

Non-surgical treatments provide conservative management options for Canine Hip Dysplasia, aiming to alleviate pain, improve mobility, and slow down the progression of the condition. In the next section, we will explore surgical treatments for dogs with more severe cases of Canine Hip Dysplasia.

Surgical Treatments for Canine Hip Dysplasia

In more severe cases of Canine Hip Dysplasia, surgical intervention may be necessary to alleviate pain, improve joint stability, and restore mobility. In this section, we will discuss the different surgical treatment options available for dogs with Canine Hip Dysplasia.

Who are the Candidates for Surgery?

Surgical treatment is typically recommended for dogs with moderate to severe Canine Hip Dysplasia that do not respond adequately to non-surgical treatments. The decision to proceed with surgery is based on various factors, including the dog’s age, overall health, severity of symptoms, and the presence of concurrent orthopedic conditions.

A thorough evaluation by a veterinarian or a board-certified veterinary surgeon is necessary to determine if surgical intervention is appropriate for a particular dog.

Different Types of Surgery

There are several surgical procedures available for the treatment of Canine Hip Dysplasia. The choice of surgery depends on various factors, such as the dog’s age, the severity of the condition, and the veterinarian’s expertise. Here are some common surgical options:

  • Total Hip Replacement (THR): THR is considered the gold standard for severe cases of Canine Hip Dysplasia. It involves replacing the entire hip joint with an artificial joint, typically made of metal and plastic components. This procedure offers excellent long-term results and significantly improves the dog’s quality of life.
  • Femoral Head and Neck Excision (FHO): FHO involves removing the head and neck of the femur (the ball-shaped end of the femur), eliminating the painful bone-on-bone contact in the hip joint. The surrounding muscles and scar tissue eventually form a “false joint,” providing improved comfort and mobility. This procedure is typically performed on smaller dogs or in cases where total hip replacement is not feasible.
  • Triple Pelvic Osteotomy (TPO): TPO is a procedure commonly performed on puppies with hip dysplasia. It involves surgically repositioning the hip socket to improve stability and function.
  • Juvenile Pubic Symphysiodesis (JPS): JPS is a procedure performed on puppies between 12-20 weeks of age. It involves fusing the pelvic bones to redirect the forces on the hip joint, promoting better development and reducing the risk of future hip dysplasia.

The choice of treatment will depend on factors such as the dog’s age, overall health, severity of the condition, and the veterinarian’s recommendation. It is important to consult with a qualified veterinarian to determine the most suitable treatment approach for your dog.

Post-Surgery Care and Recovery

After undergoing surgery for Canine Hip Dysplasia, proper post-operative care and rehabilitation are essential for a successful recovery. This may include:

  1. Restricted activity: The dog will need to limit physical activity, including jumping, running, and strenuous exercise, during the initial recovery period.
  2. Pain management: Pain medication will be prescribed to manage post-operative discomfort. It is crucial to follow the veterinarian’s instructions regarding medication administration.
  3. Physical therapy and rehabilitation: Rehabilitation exercises, under the guidance of a veterinarian or a certified canine rehabilitation therapist, help strengthen the muscles, restore range of motion, and promote healing.
  4. Follow-up appointments: Regular follow-up visits with the veterinarian are necessary to monitor the dog’s progress, remove stitches if applicable, and make any necessary adjustments to the treatment plan.

Surgical treatments offer viable options for dogs with severe Canine Hip Dysplasia, providing long-term pain relief and improved mobility. However, it is essential to discuss the potential risks, benefits, and expected outcomes with a veterinarian or a board-certified veterinary surgeon before making a decision. In the next section, we will explore alternative treatments that can complement traditional approaches for Canine Hip Dysplasia.

Alternative Treatments for Canine Hip Dysplasia

While traditional treatments like non-surgical and surgical options are commonly used for Canine Hip Dysplasia, alternative treatments can also play a supportive role in managing the condition. In this section, we will explore some alternative treatment options that may complement traditional approaches.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese practice that involves the insertion of thin needles into specific points on the body. It is believed to stimulate the body’s natural healing processes and promote pain relief. Acupuncture can help manage pain and improve mobility in dogs with Canine Hip Dysplasia. It is important to seek a qualified and experienced veterinary acupuncturist for this treatment.

Hydrotherapy

Hydrotherapy, which involves exercises performed in water, can be beneficial for dogs with Canine Hip Dysplasia. The buoyancy of water reduces the stress on the joints and allows for low-impact exercise. Swimming or using an underwater treadmill can help improve muscle strength, joint mobility, and overall fitness without putting excessive strain on the affected hips.

Dietary Supplements

Certain dietary supplements can support joint health and reduce inflammation in dogs with Canine Hip Dysplasia. Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are commonly used to promote joint cartilage health and reduce pain. Omega-3 fatty acids, such as fish oil, have anti-inflammatory properties and can aid in managing joint inflammation. Other joint-supporting nutraceuticals, such as green-lipped mussel extract and turmeric, may also be beneficial. It is important to consult with a veterinarian to determine the appropriate supplements and dosages for your dog.

Cold Laser Therapy

Cold laser therapy, also known as low-level laser therapy (LLLT), uses light energy to stimulate healing and reduce inflammation. It can be used as a non-invasive treatment for pain relief and to promote tissue repair in dogs with Canine Hip Dysplasia. Cold laser therapy is typically performed by a trained veterinarian or a certified veterinary technician.

Massage and Physical Manipulation

Massage therapy and physical manipulation techniques, such as chiropractic adjustments, can help alleviate muscle tension, improve circulation, and enhance joint mobility in dogs with Canine Hip Dysplasia. It is important to seek a qualified and experienced professional who specializes in animal massage or veterinary chiropractic care.

Alternative treatments can provide additional support and relief for dogs with Canine Hip Dysplasia. However, it is crucial to consult with a veterinarian before incorporating these treatments into your dog’s care plan. In the next section, we will discuss preventive measures that can help reduce the risk of Canine Hip Dysplasia.

Prevention and Management of Canine Hip Dysplasia

Prevention and management play a vital role in reducing the risk of canine hip dysplasia and providing effective support for dogs already affected by the condition. In this section, we will explore various preventive measures and management strategies that can contribute to the overall well-being of dogs with hip dysplasia.

Importance of Regular Exercise:

  • Provide regular, low-impact exercise to maintain muscle strength and joint mobility.
  • Avoid high-impact activities that put excessive stress on the hip joints.

Regular exercise is crucial for maintaining overall health and preventing obesity in dogs. However, it is essential to provide appropriate exercise for each dog’s age, breed, and individual needs. Avoid excessive high-impact activities, especially during the growth stage, as they can put excessive stress on the developing hip joints. Consult with a veterinarian to develop an exercise routine that promotes muscle strength, joint flexibility, and overall fitness without compromising the hip joints.

Consult with a veterinarian or a professional dog trainer for appropriate exercise routines tailored to your dog’s specific needs.

Proper Nutrition:

  • Feed a balanced and nutritious diet to ensure proper growth and development.
  • Avoid overfeeding, as excessive weight can contribute to joint stress and exacerbate hip dysplasia.
  • Consider specialized diets or joint supplements that promote joint health and reduce inflammation.

Proper nutrition is essential for the healthy development of bones and joints in dogs. Providing a balanced and appropriate diet, especially during the puppy stage, can help support proper growth and reduce the risk of hip dysplasia. Consult with a veterinarian to determine the appropriate diet for your dog’s breed, age, and specific needs.

Genetic Screening

If you are considering getting a dog from a specific breed that is prone to Canine Hip Dysplasia, it is important to research and select a reputable breeder. Responsible breeders perform genetic screening tests on their breeding dogs to assess the risk of passing on hip dysplasia to their offspring. Look for breeders who have their dogs certified by organizations such as the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) or the Canine Health Information Center (CHIC).

Early Spay/Neuter Consideration

There is ongoing research regarding the impact of early spaying or neutering on the risk of Canine Hip Dysplasia. Some studies suggest that delaying the procedure until after the growth plates have closed may help reduce the risk of developing hip dysplasia. Discuss the timing of spaying or neutering with your veterinarian, considering the specific breed and individual circumstances.

Regular Vet Check-ups:

  • Schedule regular veterinary visits to monitor your dog’s overall health, including their hip joint condition.
  • Early detection and intervention can help manage hip dysplasia more effectively.

Regular veterinary check-ups are essential for monitoring your dog’s overall health, including the musculoskeletal system. A veterinarian can assess the dog’s gait, range of motion, and any signs of discomfort or abnormality. Early detection of hip dysplasia or other orthopedic conditions can lead to timely intervention and management.

By implementing these preventive measures, you can reduce the risk of Canine Hip Dysplasia and promote healthy hip development in your dog. Remember to consult with a veterinarian for personalized advice based on your dog’s specific needs and circumstances.

Management of Weight:

  • Maintain a healthy weight for your dog to reduce strain on the hip joints.
  • Consult with a veterinarian to develop a weight management plan if your dog is overweight or prone to weight gain.

Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation:

  • Engage in physical therapy exercises prescribed by a veterinarian or a professional therapist to improve joint mobility and muscle strength.
  • Consider hydrotherapy, massage therapy, or other rehabilitation techniques to manage pain and improve overall mobility.

Environmental Modifications:

  • Provide a comfortable and supportive environment for your dog, including orthopedic beds and non-slip surfaces to prevent falls or injuries.
  • Use ramps or stairs to minimize jumping and provide easy access to furniture or vehicles.

Breeding Practices:

If you are a breeder, prioritize responsible breeding practices to reduce the risk of passing on hip dysplasia to future generations. Perform appropriate health screenings on breeding dogs to ensure they are free from hip dysplasia.

By implementing these preventive measures and management strategies, you can help reduce the risk of canine hip dysplasia, alleviate discomfort, and improve the overall quality of life for dogs with this condition.

Conclusion:
Understanding and managing canine hip dysplasia is essential for dog owners and enthusiasts. By recognizing the symptoms, seeking early diagnosis, and exploring appropriate treatment options, you can provide the necessary support and care to improve your dog’s well-being. Additionally, preventive measures and effective management strategies can help reduce the risk of hip dysplasia and promote overall joint health in dogs. Remember, consulting with a veterinarian is crucial for tailored advice and guidance based on your dog’s specific needs. With knowledge and proactive measures, you can make a positive impact on your dog’s life and ensure their comfort and mobility for years to come.

Canine hip dysplasia is a developmental disorder that affects the hip joint in dogs. It is characterized by an abnormal formation of the hip joint, leading to joint instability and degeneration. The condition can range from mild to severe and can affect one or both hips.

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